Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Captain
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎08-27-2013

Ethanol Issues

I am considering repowering my boat because I am beginning to experience problems as a result of degradation of some engine parts (carburetor bowls) in my Johnson 150HP Oceanrunners as a result (according to my dealer) of the continued use of gas with ethanol added to it.  What if anything, has BRP done in the  design and manufacture of their V6 Etecs to address the problems ethanol added fuel can create over a period of time to insure that there will not be ethanol related problems with the parts used in the Etecs.

Skipper
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎06-14-2012

Re: Ethanol Issues

As I understand, the E-tec has a sealed fuel system.  So we must protect the fuel in the Tank. I also just bought a 250HO and have the top of the fuel tank painted with a dark gray.  This does seem to help.  I also use the Marine STA-BIL..  This is not just a 2cycle issue.  I have seen the fuel lines off a 4 stroke absolutely ate up.  Smiley Frustrated

 

I too have the same concern.

Admiral
Posts: 6,331
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Ethanol Issues

Hi Jim,

 

As you know, ethanol laced fuels affect all gasoline engines, not just outboards.

 

The biggest problem is when enough moisture is absorbed into the fuel and combines with the ethanol alcohol to settle out and migrate to the bottom of the gas tank. As that ethanol and water mix is much stronger than 10% and much more corrosive than ethanol alone, that is what causes problems if it gets sucked up into the engine.

 

In Brazil they run 22-25% ethanol in their gasoline and E-TECs work better there than other brands. Precautions and more maintenance are taken seriously by pumping out old fuel from the boats after more than 2 weeks.

 

The EPA requires new hoses to cut down on permeation vapors being released into the air. These new hoses are also better resistant to higher ethanol concentrations than engines older than 2010 are.

 

Ethanol can still be a problem but no where near what it used to be.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎08-27-2013

Re: Ethanol Issues

Thank you for the response.  I am planning to replace the fuel lines that go from the tank to the Racor filters as well as those that go from the Racor Filters to the engines with the newer fuel hose.   My specific question however was what has BRP done in th way of design and construction of the ETEC engines to insure that the parts of the engine that come in contact with the gas will not be degraded over time by the ethanol in the fuel as has happened to my engines, i.e have they used different materials that are resistant to the ethanol.

Admiral
Posts: 6,331
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Ethanol Issues

[ Edited ]

Jim,

 

All E-TEC fuel system parts are E-10 resistant. Later E-TECs with the mandated new EPA low-permeation fuel hoses are more resistant to ethanol in higher concentrations.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 26
Registered: ‎04-30-2013

Re: Ethanol Issues

 

What does painting the top of the fuel tank contribute to reducing the effects of ethanol fuels?

Skipper
Posts: 20
Registered: ‎06-14-2012

Re: Ethanol Issues

Painting the top of the fuel tank does change the effect of UV rays on the fuel in the tank.  My dealer has conducted studies on exposed fuel tanks and has found that it slows the accumulation of moisture.Smiley Happy