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Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-04-2017

Motor height and RPM's

2017 E90DPLGAFD

 

Bill,

 

Take a look at this video....  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fKXCDTKqyU

 

Do you think the motor should be raised a hole or two?

 

I'm hitting 5350 - 5400 trimmed out for best SOG, which I think is a little high.  EV Diag recorded max at 5393.  I'm running a 13.2 X 19 prop (Evinrude aluminum) on a KingFisher 1625 Falcon.  I think I read that I should be targetting 5200 RPM with a moderate load of supplies/people onboard which is typical for us.

 

What do you think would be the best course to get me down to 5100 - 5200?  21 pitch + raise?

 

Thanks!

 

 

Captain
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎09-12-2016

The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The higher you are in that range the better. To me your engine looks like it could be raised.
Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-04-2017

Re: The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

 

I agree, that is the correct operating range....  still trying to find where I seen that 5200 is the optimum WOT RPM?

Captain
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎09-12-2016

Re: The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

<p>Ok, maybe there is something like that for that engine. I'm more concern with lugging so I try for the highest in the range.</p>
Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-04-2017

Re: The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

 

Here is a link to some info on this....

 

http://www.etecownersgroup.com/post?id=5396435

Captain
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎09-12-2016

Re: The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

I'm very familiar with this. Evinride used to publish both ranges. What you don't want to do is prop your boat at the low end of the OLD published full throttle operating range because it will lug the engine. Evinride only publish one range now. You'll see in 2012 the lower limit is much lower for full throttle operating range. I stand by my original statements.

Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎04-04-2017

Re: The operating range for that motor is 5000-5500 RPM. The...

 

Ok... copy that.  

 

I'm happy with the way she runs/accelerates now so maybe I'll hold of on the prop till I can raise the motor.

 

Thanks!

Admiral
Posts: 6,296
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Motor height and RPM's

[ Edited ]

hrdrokn wrote:

2017 E90DPLGAFD

 

 

Take a look at this video....  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fKXCDTKqyU

 

Do you think the motor should be raised a hole or two?

 

 

I'm hitting 5350 - 5400 trimmed out for best SOG, which I think is a little high.  EV Diag recorded max at 5393.  I'm running a 13.2 X 19 prop (Evinrude aluminum) on a KingFisher 1625 Falcon.

 

What do you think would be the best course to get me down to 5100 - 5200?  21 pitch + raise?

------------------------------------------------------- 

 

 

Outboards have not been designated by year for the past 4 years. Everything is by model number now, for all makes of motors. Yours is an Evinrude E-TEC 90 HP  AF model with a D suffix.

 

The factory operating range is 5000-5500 rpm and the optimal range is 5000-5200 according to Evinrude service bulletin No. 2017-05(D)

 

First raise your motor on the transom 1 or 2 holes and try it out. If you switch to a stainless steel prop you will pick up a bit of speed and possibly lower the rpm by 100 or 200 rpm plus run at a higher mounting hole than with an aluminum version.  If you can get somewhere near 5200 rpm with a normal load on board, the motor would be most efficient and economical.

 

Get the engine height determined first, then try different props to get the desired rpm.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎09-12-2016

Re: Motor height and RPM's

[ Edited ]

So there is special bulletin for that engine.(looks like it came out this year)

You should point that out to your dealer. 

 

"Outboards have not been designated by year for the past 4 years. Everything is by model number now, for all makes of motors. "

 

And yet every dealer on the planet for every brand still advertizes and talks  about the engines WRT calendar year. The bill of sale usually have a calendar year. And every website like this always points this out. There is still a manufactureling date on the motor so listing a year and a model number like the OP did is perfectly correct.

 

I'

Admiral
Posts: 6,296
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Motor height and RPM's


muskiemouth wrote:

So there is special bulletin for that engine.(looks like it came out this year)

 


 

 

 

Can you elaborate on this "special bulletin" and furnish more information such as the date and bulletin number  and what it entails?

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.