Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Skipper
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

200g2 code issues resulting in tow back to ramp

Well the problems have kept coming after a new power head and resolving the knock issue on the # 2 cylinder issue. After four successful outings I have reached a new milestone associated with BRP a tow back to the ramp due due to 5 codes:

 

19 private network communications fault

20 pblc network communication fault

21 network communications fault

33 ground fault

36 waiting neutral (was in neutral)

 

Nothing works, tilt/trim, constant beep from remote display and all lifts on throttle start blinking. Jack plate works fine. All batteries successfully were load tested. 

 

The 1st time this happened  I was able to disconnect the battery and was able to go to the next spot. The second occurrence I was not so lucky, however I had a friend out in another boat and was able to tow me back to the ramp and the guess what I turned the key and it worked and the codes went away once we arrived at the ramp. 

 

This is is especially disturbing because of the randomness of the issue. We run to remote areas and offshore with this boat and am truly concerned with its reliability. It has actually become quite the joke in the circle of fishing friends that I run with joking that I can save some money by keeping my boat at the certified platinum dealership instead of my boat storage unit. 

 

I am am not sure if this is an issue with the communication package or an issue associated with the power head replacement but it sure would be cool if BRP could provide Pete Jorgenson Marine in Beaumont as well as myself with some guidance to repair and to restore my faith in this purchase. 

 

Boat is currently at the shop.  

 

Once again hoping for the best..........

 

Dan

 

 

Admiral
Posts: 7,054
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: 200g2 code issues resulting in tow back to ramp

[ Edited ]

 

 

We are sorry that your Evinrude has not lived up to your expectations. The service codes you described point to the networking and the backup system. Though hard to find, it could be as simple as an intermittent connection or component somewhere in the rigging. The code 33 ground fault error suggests that. A software update could be needed in the controls or engine is also a possibility to prevent a signal mismatch.

 

BRP Evinrude provides a support team for dealers who may encounter hard to diagnose situations. All your dealer technician has to do is contact them for assistance.

 

You may also contact Evinrude by email -  http://www.brp.com/en/forms/contact-us.html if your dealer is unable to repair your motor to your satisfaction.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎10-21-2015

Re: 200g2 code issues resulting in tow back to ramp

The five fault codes you have listed all originated from the control head.  In order to get a fuller picture of what occurred, you should also interrogate the engine to see if there are any stored faults in the EMM as well.  As the outboard motors and control systems have become far more complex, it is imperative to look at the entire system when attempting a diagnosis and repair.

 

The faults you cited have the following meaning:

 

19 private network communications fault - Means that the control head quit receiving a CAN message which is regularly broadcast by the EMM on the private network.  It's primary function is a "heartbeat" indicator to let the control head know the EMM is there and communication between the EMM and control head is possible.

 

20 pblc network communication fault - Similar to the above fault but this fault refers to the public (NMEA 2000) network.  Again, it indicates that the control head does not hear the "heartbeat" message from the EMM being broadcast on the Public network.

 

21 network communications fault - This is the critical fault.  It is generated due to faults 19 and 20 both being active at the same time.  The control system is designed to be redundant in that proper operation of the engine/controls is possible with just one of the two networks (private/public) functional.  If both networks fail, there is no means for the control head to communicate with the EMM and the EMM takes steps to bring the system into a known stable condition.

 

33 ground fault - This fault indicates that the ground wire, within the Private network cable, has become open circuit.  There is a 3 A fuse located in the engine fuse panel which protects this ground circuit.  Should the fuse open, fault code 33 would become active.  However, this would have no impact on the Public network integrity.  Obviously not your issue here because the system came back to life at the dock.  Fuses don't mend themselves.

 

36 waiting neutral (was in neutral) - In this case, this fault is a secondary issue.  It was generated by the control head as a result of total loss of communication with the engine (EMM).  It had no way of knowing that the engine was indeed in neutral position.

 

 

"Nothing works, tilt/trim, constant beep from remote display and all lifts on throttle start blinking." - Trim function would not be expected to function as both communications networks are already known to be inoperative.  The trim function is initiated by means of a CAN message from the control head to the EMM.

The constant beeps of the remote display were likely due to the active faults.  Did you notice whether there was any valid engine data being displayed on the instrument?  That would tell you whether the engine (EMM) was communicating anything over the Public (NMEA 2000) network.  A good clue.

All light flashing on the control head are the functional result of the active faults you cited.

 

How did you determine the five faults you cited?  If you read them on the remote display, this is an interesting fact as it would mean the Public network was intact and functional between the control head and the display.  Another clue perhaps.

 

In order to further assess the failure, more information is needed.  A good place to start is obtaining stored faults from the EMM.

 

Skipper
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

Re: 200g2 code issues resulting in tow back to ramp

Loose negative battery lug on engine, caused during power head change out. The shop apologized for the inconvenience and said that there was nothing wrong with any BRP products installed.  If this ever happens to anyone out there pop the top cowling where you put in the oil and ensure both lugs are tight. You will have to remove the flywheel cove to tighten the back of the lugs.  

 

Let the the adventure continue!

 

Dan

Admiral
Posts: 7,054
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: 200g2 code issues resulting in tow back to ramp

 

 

There was a service bulletin a few years ago that addressed the cable mounting studs not being torqued sufficiently and causing electrical gremlins.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.