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Captain
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎09-25-2016

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

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Captain
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎09-25-2016

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

Our dealer changed out the pressure relief valve spring, water intakes, and lowered our motor.  We took out for a test ride and the temp alarm went off again.

 

3900 RPM (roughly)

 

Admiral
Posts: 6,149
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

 

 

I'm sorry to hear that the problem is not resolved yet.

 

Has the dealer hooked up a water pressure gauge and monitored the pressures at various rpm and compare to the service literature?

 

Did your dealer do the "clear hose on the EMM" procedure to determine if aerated water was getting into the cooling system?

 

The EMM report showed within a 3 hour period that the engine temp sensors, air temp sensor, throttle sensor, and oil pressure sensor showed alarms.  That is very unusual to happen to unrelated sensors in such a short period of time. The common denominator is the 5 volt sensor power circuitry. It may be a good idea to have the tech monitor the sensor voltage while the motor is operating at all speeds.

***************


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                                                 -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald


***************
The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. If you elect to do it yourself, be sure to use caution, common sense, and to observe all safety procedures in the vicinity of gasoline, moving engine parts, high temperature components, heavy items, and electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.
Captain
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎09-25-2016

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

Bill,

 

I will forward on. They were talking to BRP again on Friday so hoping they are able to find out what it is.  I believe they did do quite a few of the tests but will check.  

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Captain
Posts: 25
Registered: ‎09-25-2016

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

We have had it out quite a few different times over the course of the fixes and it is still just in that cruising speed 3500-4000 rpm range when it goes off.

Captain
Posts: 67
Registered: ‎10-21-2015

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

If the analog supply was being pulled down enough to be affecting peripheral sensor readings, I would usually expect to fide code 78 as well.  Not shown here.

 

The 2 minute history clearly shows the engine cooling down from a fairly warm condition.  As the overheat is described as happening only in certain RPM range, wouldn't one suspect poor inlet water condition?  Aeration, etc.?

 

I really don't know what to make of the oil pressure sender faults at this point.

Admiral
Posts: 6,149
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: E-Tec 135 Hot Light

If you can get the data from the dealer, post what the water pressures are at idle and every 1000 rpm increment and at WOT. Also ask if a tech temporarily installed a clear hose at the EMM water cooling port and monitored for air bubbles at all rpm ranges, during turns, and at various trim settings.

***************


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                                                 -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald


***************
The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. If you elect to do it yourself, be sure to use caution, common sense, and to observe all safety procedures in the vicinity of gasoline, moving engine parts, high temperature components, heavy items, and electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.