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Skipper
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎08-21-2017

throttle control assembly dated and broken - upgrade options?

Just bought an old 1983 wellcraft with a 1989 Johnson 200VRO (J200TXCE) - the shifter / throttle control assembly barely functions and instead of buying a lot of $$$! pieces to repair it, I was wondering if I can swap it out with something newer?

 

I called my local Evinrude service center and he quickly told me that Evinrude makes a side mounted remote that is universal to all their motors, you just buy the engine matching electrical adapter harness. I didn't press him further because I had no intention of ordering a BRAND new one through the dealer. (would probably cost as much as I paid for the boat + trailer!)

 

So based on what he said, is there a design universality through-out the years that gives me flexibility of choice when looking for its replacement? As in can I go junkyard picking and pretty much any Johnson / Evinrude remote will work perfectly as long as I wire it correctly? OR is it a case where I have to cross reference part numbers to find certain types that are completely compatible with my motor?

 

For instance I have a Nikon DSLR camera - NIkon lenses have kept the same mount since the early 60's so aside from some built in special features not working on certain older lenses when used in my new DSLR, I can basically use any lens Nikon has made since 1961(ish) no problem - If I had a Canon DSLR which does not employ a universal mount across models, I'd need to have explicit knowledge of which lens can mount to which camera body.

 

In my mind, how different can they be since they only consist of a throttle, gear selector, choke, pirmer / ignition switch and trim switches?!?!

 

thank!

Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎07-22-2015

Re: throttle control assembly dated and broken - upgrade options?

You can use any Johnson/Evinrude control assembly from your current model year up to 1996 without having to change your wiring harness. Ebay has many styles. The wiring harness was changed in 1996 to the new MWS style instead of the old BIG Red plug style harness.

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Skipper
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎08-21-2017

Re: throttle control assembly dated and broken - upgrade options?

Do the 96+ have anything different in them that would prevent me from splicing them OR making a wiring adapter harness?

IE electronic control levers in lieu of cable controls, can-bus encoders, etc
Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎07-22-2015

Re: throttle control assembly dated and broken - upgrade options?

No CanBuss technology on your 89 200 it is all old school carbs no NEMA network in the motor. So you can splice in the harness if you wish.It is just easier to use your current wiring harness

Admiral
Posts: 6,331
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: throttle control assembly dated and broken - upgrade options?

[ Edited ]

Your 1989 Johnson is similar to Nikon for interchangeability as it can use various OMC control boxes and wiring harnesses  produced from 1973 to 1995 that use the round red connector plug for attaching the boat wiring to the engine harness. In 1996 the wiring connection was changed to the MWS cable with consisted of 2  6-pin connectors and a 3-pin connector.  You can jury-rig and splice the wires but it is best if you can avoid it. It is also recommended to use a 1978 or later control box as those use the one-piece cables that have the ends attached to them. The earlier ones used the old-style cables with bare wire at each end and needed the hardware kits to assemble the control box and engine connectors.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



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The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.