Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-14-2014

Prop seals brunt

2007 Evinrude E tech 150 serial #5175561 2008 power head less then 70 hrs on motor prop shaft seals burning out leaking lower unit oil this is the second set of seals I've gone through Evinrude says there's a port in the head that needs to be drilled out this sounds like a recall to the engine due to the fact that Evinrude says to pull the head and drill a Waterport two 5/16 which is a modification of the engine. This modification is supposed to allow more water to go to the exhausts to keep from burning prop shaft seals now this sounds like Evinrude once the customer to pay for their modifications even though the motor is out of warranty has anyone ever heard of this or scene of this happening help with info thanks for your help
Admiral
Posts: 6,333
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Prop seals brunt

[ Edited ]

 

 

Your dealer should be aware of the service literature that describes drilling out the gearcase hole 5/16"  from the trim tab to the exhaust cavity for more water flow. The trim tab must be inspected and not modified which could restrict water flow.  A mention in one of the Service Update books sent to all dealers shows where to drill the exhaust pipe to increase cooling water for the seals if needed.

 

Engine condition affects temperatures also. Make sure the motor is in a good state of tune and the boat's plumbing is checked for restrictions and air leaks per the training taught in the service schools. Engine mounting height, trimming out too far, and transom obstructions to good water flow into the inlet screens can contribute to the problem.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-14-2014

Re: Prop seals brunt

You don't understand your tech told my dealer to pull the power head and drill a water outlet out larger in the power head and made a modification to the head now that should be some kind of recalls for that motor
Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-14-2014

Re: Prop seals brunt

I talked to the customer service department a week ago and try to explain what happen and told them what was performed to the motor by a authorized dealer and they seem that they could care less ,ask to speak to a manager a week ago and still no phone call this goes to show you ....... Bought this motor feb 2007 blown power head September ...... Stop charging had a new stator and flywheel put on ..... Bendix on the starter breaks........ Two sets of Prop Seals burnout ..... What's next ???
Admiral
Posts: 6,333
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Prop seals brunt

Hi Rich,

 

Your burning the propshaft seals is pretty rare but it does happen occasionally in boats that use jackplates, in some tunnel hulls, and often when operated in water with plant life or debris. Aerated cooling water getting ingested into the water inlets can contribute to the problem. It is not a common problem for normal recreational boating.

 

Your dealer wanting to pull the powerhead and drilling out the cooling water passage in the inner exhaust housing accomplishes 2 things. It allows more water into the exhaust stream to cool the hot gasses plus the larger hole has less of a chance of being restricted or plugged up when running in sandy or debris laden waters.

 

Your dealer can test for aerated cooling water by running the boat using a piece of clear hose temporarily attached to the EMM to VST water hose and watching for bubbles at various speeds.  In addition, if you have a recent computer printout of your engine, you can examine the EMM temperature profile. If there is a noticable percentage of time within the 120-160°F range or even higher, then that is a dead givaway that the cooling system is ingesting aerated water from the boat or from the motor being mounted too high and sucking air in. Aerated water does not absorb heat like liquid water does. It is similar to a "head of beer" that does not quench a thirst like a mug of liquid beer does.  It could also mean that the cooling system is restricted in some way, often from mud, sand, or debris.

 

You may want to have the above tests and inspections done before going through the time and expense of pulling the powerhead and exhaust system apart.

 

 

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 52
Registered: ‎12-30-2012

Re: Prop seals brunt

[ Edited ]

Bill, could he change the type of screens on the lower unit to help with this ? Seems like I heard there are 2 or 3 different types of screens available or I may be wrong and just thought I heard this. If there is a different type available, that may help with the aerated water problem. Just a thought.

Admiral
Posts: 6,333
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Prop seals brunt

If it were an aerated water problem, and that has yet to be determiinedt, then the high flow water inlets are one of the options to help alleviate the cooling situation.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.