Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-19-2018

Loss in performance 2007 225 E225DPXSU

Hello,

 

I have a '97 272 Grady White Sailfish with twin 2007 225 Etecs (E225DPXSU and E225DCXSU) that I just recently purchased.  Both engines have a little over 600hrs.  I just replaced plugs, thermostats, blow off valves, engine fuel filters, boat-side fuel filters, and impellers.

 

Since I got the boat, before and after recent service, the port motor doesn't seem to put out as much power as the starboard.  Both engines are propped w/Vipers.  The starboard will hit about 5700 at WOT while the port is lagging about 300 rpms behind at 5400 (both motors are trimmed the same @ 50%). 

 

The starboard has enough power to put the boat on plane by itself.  The port side does not.

 

When throttles are pushed forward together, the port motor will sit about 300rpms behind the starboard.  I verified that the throttle linkages on the two motors are physically moving in parallel with the binnacle controls.  I performed a compression check on the motors when I purchased the boat.  I can't remember all the readings, but they were all a few psi apart and consistent with eachother.

 

It's also using more fuel and oil than the starboard motor.  No check engine light.  I'll post pictures of the plugs later today.  All but one looked the same. I was thinking I may have a cloggd or leaky injector, but it was suggested by a local dealer, who just heard my issues second hand, that it may be a cracked/broken reed.  They suggested that I start my troubleshooting with a leakdown test, so I bought the tool to do it and I'm in the process of doing that now.  From what I found (Google), automotive guys run the pressure up to 100psi and aeromechanics run to 80psi when doing the leak down check.

 

Can someone advise what pressure I should run for the leakdown check? 

 

I already fiddled with three cylinders and ran them up to 80psi at TDC with only about 4% loss, but I wanted to make sure I use the recommended/industry standard pressure for testing.

 

Also looking for further guidance as I move through the troubleshooting steps.  Will share results as info is gathered.

 

 

Disclousure: I have experience working on and building automotive, motorcycle, and some PWC 4 stroke engines.  These Etec two strokes are new to me. 

 

 

Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-19-2018

Re: Loss in performance 2007 225 E225DPXSU

So I ran the leakdown test on all cylinders up to 80psi.

 

All but one were at 3%.  The other was at 5%.  I don't know the numbering convention of the cylinders.  The cylinder with the highest percentage leak also has a different looking plug than all the other cylinders.  It's the top one on the starboard side as you stand on the ground facing the bow (Port motor). 

 

The odd plug out looks like this:

06131817501.jpg

 

All the other plugs look like this:

 

06191820091.jpg

 

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,389
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Loss in performance 2007 225 E225DPXSU

That cylinder should be looked into and the injector checked for corrosion, leakage, and debris.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



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The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.