Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
Reply
Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-20-2015

Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

2002 150hp Evinrude

Attempted to change water pump this weekend.

Getting the lower unit off, after unscrewing the shift linkage screw, and changing the water pump was pretty straight forward.  Now I'm having a problem re-installing the lower unit.

1st attempt: no matter what gear I was in, forward/neutral/reverse, the prop would continue spinning counter clockwise (even in neutral. Pump was pumping water fine. When motor is not running, cannot spin prop freely.

Several attempts later,now prop would not spin at all while in forward//reverse.  When motor is not running prop spins freely.

I've heard rod height is important. However, I did not mess with the shifter rod. The bend at the end is facing forward.

 

How can I align the shifter rod? Is there a way to use a needle nose pliers to pull the shifter rod in place in order to slide the pin (linkage) in the hole of the shifter rod? I'm assuming since I can't shift into gear, the shifter rod is not in placed.

 

Thank you in advance for your input. Sorry is description or word of choice is inaccurate...fairly new at this.

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,052
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

 

 

It sounds like the shift rod is not engaged to the clevis with the slotted screw-pin. You may have installed and tightened the screw but it did not go through the hole in the top of the shift shaft. Because the prop spins counterclockwise, the shift shaft is pushed inward which leaves the gearcase in reverse.

 

Look closely at the clevis and screw and have someone carefully shift the control box. I will bet that the clevis rotates up and down but the shift shaft stays stationary.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-20-2015

Re: Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

pic.jpgSo I found this while searching the web. Will check it out this evening when I get home but I'm assuming from the look of this picture, I don't have the head of the shift rod (from lower unit) aligned with the pin? Is that what you are referring to BluewaterBill?

 

How do I go about doing what you described below? Newbie so I'm not sure what "clevis" is.  

 

Thanks and appreciate your help!  

 

 

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,052
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

 

 

Forget about the slotted screw and clevis in my previous post, I was thinking of a newer engine than what you have. Sorry about that.

 

The same situation applies to your engine, though.  Your clevis is the piece with the pin attached  that connects through the hole in the shift rod.  It has the bolt holding it onto the shaft and is the piece that you labeled "there is a pin attached to this piece..."

 

 

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-20-2015

Re: Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

Thanks BluewaterBill; really appreciate you helping a newbie!   I actually figured it out later than evening but haven't had a chance to update.

 

Took the port side lower crowling off for a better view and immediately noticed the problem. The pin wasn't through the hole of the shift rod (shift rod was turned to the side). Took all but a couple minutes using a needle nose plier to turn the shift rod to align with the clevis pin.

 

It now works like a charm! Great sense of accomplishment, saved $$$ and the next time around it will be a breeze!

 

Now, with that being completed, do you know what the torque specs are for the lower unit bolts? Or would simply tightening the bolt be suffice?  

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,052
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Lower Unit Shaft Alignment….Help!

 

 

Glad to hear that you found the problem.

 

Torque the screws 36 to 60 in lbs.  Do not use the screws to pull the halves together, postion the covers, then torque the screws

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.