Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Captain
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎09-13-2011

A Matter of Choice

I was in my Evinrude Dealer yesterday.  Over the years he stil has some G1's in the Showroom that have been sitting awhile.

 

He has a 2014 225 Etec, for $17,700, (Thunder block), and a 2016 Etec 200 (Eagle block) for $16,600. 

 

I get can either one, this April, with a 10 year warranty.

 

I like both, but I'm used to the low end torque the 3.0 thunder block provies me when running grumpy inlets.

 

The salesguy said I would lose  a little of that with the 2.6. 

 

But my main question is, , is there any significant updates that were done betwenn 2014 and 2016?

 

These are both Systen Check motors, and would hook up to my Ocean Pro instruments and controls with no fuss.

 

 

Captain
Posts: 197
Registered: ‎09-12-2016

Re: A Matter of Choice

IMHO there is no sigtnificant updates. The G1 are end of life from a manufactuing point of view.

 

I would choose the 225, the grunt of that engine will blow away the smallblock.

 

 

Admiral
Posts: 8,195
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: A Matter of Choice

You did not mention what kind and size of boat and how you use it.

 

The big block engine with its greater torque would be beneficial in a majority of situations.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎09-13-2011

Re: A Matter of Choice

[ Edited ]

A 22 foot Deep Vee (Ray Hunt) center Console. Same as a Bertram Hull

 

I'm use to the 3.0 litre grunt of the Ocean Pro, because she digs the boat out of a following sea with aplomb when running an angry inlet.  I don't want to loose that.  

 

She's a rather heavy boat for her size, (built a 1972), but either engine would not have a problem,

 

I will admit the 225,  3.3 would have even more power than the 3.0 O-Pro, and you can never have too much power when going offshore.

 

With a nice Rebel prop, I'd like to cruise at about 3000 rpm (thats what the O-Pro gives me now) or maybe less. I think it would be "light" duty for this big engine.  

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 8,195
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: A Matter of Choice

 

You would need the Evinrude E-TEC 225 HP  for best performance and enjoyment. Be sure to prop the engine in the 5600-5800 rpm range, a Rebel would be the optimum choice of propeller for that deep V hull.

 

When set up properly you will be amazed at the fuel economy compared to your older motor. Chances are it will only use about 1/2 the fuel per trip as you do now. In addition oil savings will be substantial along with much improved acceleration and greatly reduced engine noise.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.