Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-10-2011

Adding voltage regulator to an un-regulated V-6 charging system?

I am new to both this site and Evinrude (and outboard) ownership and have an issue that I need help resolving... I have a 1985 Winner Tournament bass-boat with a 1978 Evinrude 150 that I recently got on the water in the past few weeks and also put 2 new OPTIMA batteries in (Group 27 starting / Group 31 trolling with a Pro-Mariner 10-10 on-board charger). I have had the boat on the water 6-8 times for a total of about 6-8 run hours and after about the 5th or 6th trip I noticed that I was charging at almost 18v at speed on open water (with no other 12v devices running). I have verified my volt gauge with my digital and it is dead-on. my Questions are: - How do I best validate my rectifier? - Can I run OPTIMAS on this un-regulated system? - Can I add a water-cooled voltage regulator and keep the OPTIMAS? - What regulator would be best IF I am able to do this? I am a long-time OPTIMA user (20+ years) and in all of my other vehicles the cost has been far out-weighed by the advantages, and I would REALLY like to keep them in this boat if at all possible!
Water and fishing are both forms of therapy created by God for our pleasure!
Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 8,614
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Adding voltage regulator to an un-regulated V-6 charging system?

Sealed batteries are not to be used with the old style unregulated charging systems. You could probably mix and match parts to change the charging system but you would be on your own.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



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The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Highlighted
Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-10-2011

Re: Adding voltage regulator to an un-regulated V-6 charging system?

Thanks Cappy - but based on the age of this rig, I have been on my own for quite some time now haven't I?! Any input would be appreciated as the only other 2 options I see are: - Give up on my Optimas - Install a new Evinrude that can support my batteries Thanks again!
Water and fishing are both forms of therapy created by God for our pleasure!
Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 8,614
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Adding voltage regulator to an un-regulated V-6 charging system?

Liability-wise you would be on your own. We cannot suggest modifying something that could cause damage, injury, fire, etc.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.