Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎04-09-2012

No oil alarm

Took my E Tec. 115 out for a couple of days third day no oil alarm came on. Shut motor down pumped oil bulb then started again. The motor started smoking a lot and sounded bad. Shut it down . Two days later boat started fine. Took it to the shop And they said it was fine. Anybody have similar experience?
Admiral
Posts: 8,393
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: No oil alarm

It may have been something as simple as a bubble of air getting into the oiling system which could trigger the oil pressure sensor. 

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Mate
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎04-09-2012

Re: No oil alarm

Shop checked with factory and are sending oil pump and temp sensor all under warranty very cool
Skipper
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎06-19-2012

Re: No oil alarm

Yes the second time I had my 150 out it ran out of oil one mile off shore 1.8 gallons in 70 miles total run according to GPS and that was counting the drifting while fishing. I took the boat in and they said everything was fine. I had and still do carry extra gallon of oil onboard.

Aaron

Skipper
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎06-19-2012

Re: No oil alarm

I ran out of oil and no alarm came on
Admiral
Posts: 8,393
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: No oil alarm


Aaron wrote:
I ran out of oil and no alarm came on

 

 

If you actually ran out of oil and did not get any warning light or alarm, something isn't right as there should have been 4 separate indicators to warn you. When the oil tank ran down to about 1/4, the warning horn should have sounded for 10 seconds, and the LOW OIL light should have illuminated. If you continued to run the motor until the tank was out of oil, the oil pump on the motor would sense that there was no more oil pressure and once again the alarm would sound for 10 seconds and this time the NO OIL light would come on. At the same time the motor would slow down rapidly to 1200 rpm and remain there in what is called the SAFE mode.

 

If you still say that nothing every warned you, then someone did not install, test, or equip your motor correctly. Even with all of that, the motor would still automatically slow down to 1200 rpm.


 

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎01-03-2016

Re: No oil alarm

I recently bought a new boat and it came equipped with a 115 E-Tec. I went out for my 5th time and my no oil light came on. I ran it for about 8 minutes after I launched the boat. I had well over 1/4 in the resevriour. I went into my consol and poured about another 1/2 gallon of oil. I started the engine back up and ran for another 5 minutes then the alarm came back on. I shut the engine off and on about 3 times until thick white smoke starting coming out of exhaust. I immediately turned engine off and got towed back in. Never went into safe mode. Had plenty of oil. What could this be? Engine has about 8 hours on it.
Admiral
Posts: 8,393
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: No oil alarm

 

 

Are your sure that it was the NO OIL light and not the LOW OIL light?  if the NO OIL light comes on, the motor goes instantly down to 1200 rpm for its own protection. The incident is recorded and stored in the engine computer's -- EMM's --  memory

 

White smoke is normal steam coming out of the motor exhaust..  If it were overheating, the HOT or TEMP light would come on and instantly drop to 1200 rpm.

 

 

if you are unsure of the situation, have your dealer run a diagnostic test to check out the engine. 

be sure that you read and understand the Evinrude Operator's Guide.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Captain
Posts: 139
Registered: ‎10-21-2015

Re: No oil alarm

Code 38, No oil pressure feedback fault is an often maligned, poorly understood function.  With amazing regularity, the EMM is replaced because it is reporting a fault.  Unfortunately, the EMM is almost never the culprit and the servicing Dealer is wasting time and money chasing a misconception.  Hopefully, this posting will provide a greater understanding of the mechanics of the oiling system and with it, the ability to more quickly troubleshoot and repair an engine exhibiting the problem.

 

In the beginning - Calibration files within the EMM firmware determine at what interval of time an electrical pulse is applied to the oil pump.  The interval is based upon engine RPM and throttle opening.  The oil pump is a positive displacement pump; meaning a fixed, known amount of oil is moved each time the EMM provides the electrical signal.  On a side note - EMM replacement for over oiling should never be considered.  It is impossible for the EMM to cause over oiling.  In fact, it is not possible for this oiling system to cause an over oiling condition without something else being wrong within the system.  Failure of the oil pump driver in the EMM (stuck on or off) would result in no oil being delivered, not excess.  The EMM, by adjusting the frequency of oil pump actuation in relation with fuel flow, can maintain an approximate fuel/oil ratio into the engine.  Certain operating conditions, such as continual acceleration/deceleration (skiing & tubing) will result in greater oil consumption than operating at a steady state condition.

 

But is it working? - The EMM contains circuitry which verifies the electrical integrity of connections to and the coil in the pump which causes the plunger to move.  If loss of continuity is detected, the EMM will set code 34 or 36 indicating an open circuit.  With these codes present, there certainly cannot be any oil pumping into the engine.

 

So the system has electrical continuity.  There are still other things that might go wrong that would prevent oil from being pumped into the engine.  The system needs to account for all these things as well.  One of the primary concerns is whether there is any oil in the tank.  Many other oiling systems, including the new G2 engines, provide an on engine oil tank which is physically higher than the oiling device.  In this configuration, if there is oil in the tank (think low oil switch) it's a good assumption that oil is being delivered to the pump.  We're not so fortunate to have gravity working for us on the V4-V6 system.  Here, oil is being pulled from the remote tank to the pump.  We need additional safeguards to verify oil delivery.  This is where the oil pressure sensor comes into play.

 

Oh the pressure! - The oil pump is a closed system most of the time.  The plunger in the oiler blocks one end and check valves block the other end until pressure within the pump system exceeds the check valve pressure rating.  Oil is an incompressible fluid and the oiler plunger positive displacement.  Therefore, when the oiler is actuated, the process of pumping oil into the pump system causes a rapid pressure increase within the system.  The oil pressure sensor and EMM together monitor the rapid pressure increase (if seen) and provide a pass/fail response.

 

The pressure sensor output at atmospheric pressure translates to an output of about 0.5 as observed on EvDiag Monitor form.  Applying 50 psi to the sensor will increase the output to about 1.5.  The EMM begins to repeatedly check the pressure sensor output shortly after it fires the oil pump.  It checks for 1 msec. total.  If the output increases by at least 0.3 (or 0.8 total) it decides that oil was pumped successfully.  As this all happens very quickly, the textbox in EvDiag Monitor form will not necessarily display this information.  Instead, it displays a heavily averaged value.  An oscilloscope would be needed to accurately monitor this information in real time.

 

EvDiag Monitor display can readily be used to aid in diagnostics here though.  At rest (pump not operating) if the reading is not about 0.5 then something is likely wrong with the pressure sensor.  A reading of zero would mean signal output shorted to ground or defective sensor.  A reading much higher could indicate the pump output under pressure or a damaged sensor.  Apply some pressure to the sensor and the value displayed in EvDiag should increase proportionally to the pressure applied (50 psi = 1.0).  Rapid test fire the oiler and the value displayed in EvDiag should jump up by an amount.  The exact amount is not possible to determine due to oil viscosity differences, firing rate, battery voltage, check valve pressures, etc.

 

So why the code 38? - In 99% of the cases where the oil pump is actually delivering oil but code 38 is indicated, the culprit is air within the pumping system.  Oil is not compressible but air is.  Air in the system has the effect of lowering the pressure spike and widening it as observed by the pressure sensor.  Oil can still be moving but the pressure sensor does not see the required 0.3 rise.  This can also be a cause of over oiling complaint.  A reaction to no oil being reported is that the oiler is caused to initiate a rapid firing rate in an attempt to get oil moving.  This rapid firing results in a lot of excess oil being delivered if the pump is actually moving oil.

 

Very often, air is continually introduced into the pumping system by leak somewhere between the pump and the remote tank.  Since this area is under vacuum rather than pressure, the leak is not marked by a puddle of oil.  You need to check everything between the pump inlet and the bottom of the remote tank pickup to be certain the leaks are stopped.  A leak is not so obvious in this area.

Skipper
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎03-17-2017

Re: No oil alarm

I have a 2013, 115 that shows no fault codes in the EMM and history shows none also. The system starts up when you turn the key on and the gauge does the system check "lights 4-3-2-1 on then off in about 3 seconds. 2 seconds later the "no oil", "low oil", and "ck engine" lamps come on. The dealer told me to replace the gauge. I did and no change. Since there is NO support from Evanrude, the 2 local dealers have no further answers. The other odd thing is, the tach also is not working. Continuity is good in the harness to the gauge from the engine. The engine runs normal on test runs and again, the diagnostics from the EMM have no faults codes at all. Any advise would help.