Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Skipper
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎07-03-2013

Oil consumption

Hey,

I have a new 150 HO, I know it double oils a bit at first, but this morning I go out, 5 mins in I get a low oil alarm.

I head back to dock and there is still oil in the bottom of the tank.

My question is, I know the tank was full when the motor was installed, is this normal with 4.4 hours reading on the hour gauge?
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Admiral
Posts: 9,506
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Oil consumption

[ Edited ]

The standard oil tank holds 1.8 gallons and the LOW OIL alarm sounds when about 1 or 2 quarts or so remain. If the LOW OIL warning comes on when the tank is at 1/2 or fuller, see your dealer as there may be a float switch problem inside the tank.

 

During break in which is 5 hours above 2000 rpm on your engine, it will consume more oil as that is automatically done by the engine computer. If you vary the throttle quite a bit, such as tubing or skiing, more oil is delivered when the engine is accelerating and at higher speeds.

 

Fill up the oil tank and fill up the fuel tank now that your motor is broken in then keep track of the oil consumption and the fuel used. I think that you will find that the oil usage is much less than any other traditional 2-stroke outboard motor.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Highlighted
Skipper
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎07-03-2013

Re: Oil consumption

Thanks bill! The tank was low, like an inch and a half to two inches of oil in there.

The motor is running top notch, it just surprised me that it set the alarm off already.

I'm coming from a 98 115 fast strike, so I got two extra cylinders and more horse power.

I picked up some oil today and top'd her up! I'll keep track this time see how many hound I get out of it...
Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,506
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Oil consumption

Hours per oil usage is not a good way to keep track of things.

 

Compare the gallons of gas to the oil consumed and factor in how you run the motor. More power and speed equals more oil consumption as does varying the throttle. Trolling or low speed running uses very little oil and a steady cruising speed also minimizes lubrication requirements.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Highlighted
Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎03-07-2014

Re: Oil consumption

Thanks for the info on additional oiling in the first 5 hours, I was thinking my new 200 HO's were using more oil than my old 200 evinrudes ... now have 10 hours (about 95 gal of fuel), so I will monitor for a decrease in oil consumption!

Highlighted
Skipper
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎03-07-2014

Re: Oil consumption

Following up on the additional oiling during break-in period. I went back and looked in the owner's manual for my old 2002 Evinrude 200 and indeed it did state additional oiling above 2000 rpms for first 5 hours. The "Operator's Guide" Revision C / September 2013 states "additional oiling for first 2 hours of operation above 2000 RPM" page 18. 

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 9,506
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Oil consumption

 

 

Chawk,

 

 The E-TEC 60° engine blocks add extra oil for the 5 hours above 2000 rpm. The big block 90° engines break in for 2 hours above that rpm.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.