Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-26-2012

Transom pad

I have a E-Tec 90. I am installing it on a wooden transom. What can I use for a pad between the transom and engine? Rubber?

Admiral
Posts: 7,054
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Transom pad

Transom pads can be ordered by your dealer or boat store through marine supply vendors or some folks  use truck tire mud-flaps.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-26-2012

Re: Transom pad

Thanks for the prompt input Bluewater Bill.

I am trying to verify that a rubber pad on a wooden boat is advisable and a common practice? I really can not think of a reason why not to but I thought I'd ask. 

Thanks again!

Captain
Posts: 77
Registered: ‎07-22-2011

Re: Transom pad

Just my opinion here, but...

 

I would advise against using a rubber transom pad.

 

Engine mounting bolts are required to be tightened to a torque of 40 ft lbs.

Since rubber usually has some "squish" to it, I'm concerned the tightened mounting bolts might NOT take up all the slack.

Here's why: If the engine doesn't stay tight to the transom there is potential for the engine to move. Over time, this can enlarge the bolt holes of the mounting surfaces. The wood will likely be damaged before the engine stern brackets show any wear.

 

As an alternative, I would suggest a plate made from marine-grade aluminum, or stainless steel.

 

-John

 

The postings on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent BRP's positions, strategies or opinions.
Admiral
Posts: 7,054
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Transom pad

 

 

John is correct. I read through your post too quickly the first time and then realized that you have a 90hp that is held on the transom with through-bolts. The rubber transom pads are made for the small clamp-on type motors where you would be tightening the clamp screws as needed.

 

If your boat and transom is in good shape, you should not need a pad or a plate for mounting.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-26-2012

Re: Transom pad

Thank you two very much! 

I have not thought of this aspect and it is exactly why I am on this forum. I will give this some whole new thought. Did I mention this 1962 boat is sound and in excellent condition. Transom rated for 100hp.

Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎04-26-2012

Re: Transom pad

Slightly different question on the same subjet.

 

One sugestion from another site was to use a wooden wedge plate to give the engine a slight under rake. Reportedly this makes for faster planning.

Any experience with this?  

Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 7,054
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: Transom pad

[ Edited ]

 That is not needed nomally unless your boat has a different angle between the transom and the keel instead of the industry standard  14° plus or minus 2°.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.