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Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-08-2012

High Voltage

I have an older Johnson, 70 hp.  Model # TJ70TL.  Last weekend the amp meter on the dash started to go up from 12.4 to 16 volts.  I returned to dock and unhooked the battery cables, checked the water lavel in the battery cells and let it set overnight.  Next morning started it up again and within 2-3 minutes, it started to go high again.  Would this be related to the voltage regulator and or is there a way to check it out ?  Are the regulators hard to replace and are they expensive ?   Or............would my best bet be to take it to a Marine shop.

 

Thanks

 

    C0ncret0

Captain
Posts: 35
Registered: ‎07-18-2011

Re: High Voltage

It would be best if you took it to your local dealer, he would have the special tools and the service manual to check the engine out.

The Postings on this site are my own and do not necessarily represent BRP's positions, strategies or opinions.
Admiral
Posts: 7,843
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: High Voltage

 

 

I believe that you meant to say that the VOLTMETER reads over 16 volts, not an ammeter.

 

We would need to know the complete model number of your motor as some 70hp outboards had a regulator in the charging system and others did not.

 

First check your voltmeter that it reads about 12 volts when you first turn the key to ON, before you start the motor. Often the gauge goes bad and reads way above 12V

 

It is common for the battery to be the cause of the high voltage reading if it does not have enough capacity, is getting sulphated internally, or has a problem with a cell going bad. If it is more than a couple of years old, either replace it or have it thoroughly tested.

 

 

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.


Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-08-2012

Re: High Voltage

 

T,

 

   Sorry bout that, I did mean voltmeter.  The battery was purchased one year ago at Acadamy, the 2nd time I have purchased from them.   As far as I know the complete model # is TJ70TL  -  it is a 1989 motor.  The first thing I checked was the battery.  One cell was a little low, I unhooked the cables, filled and let her sit overnight,  The next day I started her back up.  It read 12.4V for about 3-4 minutes, then the guage started to creep up to 14.  I don't think it's the battery as it is only one year old, however that was my first thought.  I am trying to get ahold of a tech. and set up an appointment.  Thanks for your inputs.

 

      -C 

Mate
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎11-08-2012

Re: High Voltage

Thanks, will do. Any inputs as to cost ?
Highlighted
Admiral
Posts: 7,843
Registered: ‎07-14-2011

Re: High Voltage

[ Edited ]

Your engine's charging system  consists only of a rectifier assembly and the stator under the flywheel. There is no voltage regulator on your motor. It is very easy to troubleshoot and if there is something wrong, normally the symptoms are dead batteries or reduced charging current and low voltage, less than 14 volts.

 

The battery acts as a regulator in your system. If it has too small capacity or a bad cell in it, then the internal resistance increases as it charges up and the voltage climbs above 16. Putting 2 batteries in parallel or installing a larger one such as a group 27 deep cycle, your voltage will be lower as they can absorb the excess.

 

Years ago with unregulated systems, boaters would turn their running lights on to help lower the high voltage.

 

 

 


"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat";
                    -- Travis McGee, main character in a book series by John D. McDonald 


 



***************

The factory recommends that a properly trained technician service your Johnson or Evinrude outboard motor. Should you elect to perform repairs yourself, use caution, common sense, and observe safety procedures in the vicinity of flammable liquids, around moving parts, near high-temperature components, and working with electrical or ignition systems.

The information offered here is only general in nature and should not be construed as complete factory approved procedures, techniques, or specifications. Always use the proper service manual for your motor, up-to-date service literature, the correct tools, and have an understanding of how to proceed with troubleshooting and repair methods. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with a procedure, a situation, or a technique, enlist the services of a factory trained technician.