Evinrude E-NATION, for those dedicated to water, power, fishing and fun
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Skipper
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎08-06-2011

Redfish are popping! For some of us

I've never been a fan of braided line, and then again.... I never took the time to re-string any reels with it.  In a recent fishing trip with a few of my friends, we got into a very large school of keeper redfish and we limited with all beautiful fish that would all place nicely in tourneys (as wells as dinner tables).  One of my friends who had braided line didn't seem to catch as many fish.  There were sometimes when it took extra time to tie knots when we had to change tackle.  The line casts FAR, but sometimes a loop form in the spool, and the only way to clear it was to cast FARTHER, even if the fish were close.  It was frustrating for him and since we are good friends, we made fun of him all day and blamed it on the operator.

 

Has anyone else experienced a "learning curve" when switching to braided line?  Im not impressed with it, but feel I might not be giving it its proper due. 

 

What do you think about braided line for inshore fishing?

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Skipper
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎09-01-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

We just switched from monofilament to braided this year. Yes it is harder to tie a knot with braided. But that is about the only downside. The uni-knot works best for me.  Just make sure you use a glove or something when pulling the knot tight. We use 40lb Power Pro for inshore snappers, trout, etc.  Any looping or "birds nests" as we call them can be chalked up to issues with the reel or it's setttings or the way the line was wound. I use braided on both of my Abu's (5500c and Record 60).

 

Personally, I switched back to mono for one trip. After that, I immediately went back to braided. Braided is just way more sensitive. Braided will slip around the spool however. My reels don't have any holes in the spool to tie to. So I used the tape that came with my Power Pro and so far no issues.

 

Yes there is a learning curve.  But I am not going back to mono.

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Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎08-03-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

The wife and I were fishing in the St Marks, Fl area last Monday. We found a school of tailing Red's in the area of marker 33 on the East side of the river. There were also 2 Gators there, feeding on these Red's (saw them chasing and catching them). We threw everything we had at these Red's but not a bite to be had. We were throwing Gulp Shrimp, Gulp Crab's, and Gulp Mullet. Caught plenty of Trout and Catfish that day but could not buy a bite from a Red.
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Skipper
Posts: 12
Registered: ‎08-03-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

Forgot to say, I use Braid on a couple of my Reels, and the Wife uses Mono. Braid's much more sensitive but takes a lot longer time to tie. I have not had "wind Loops" problems and when I tie on a leader, I usually wind up having a small barrel swivel in line with the braid.
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Skipper
Posts: 14
Registered: ‎09-06-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

Hi there - I LOVE braided line! Growing up fishing in Australia - fishing with braided line was pretty much the norm for our freshwater lakes and inshore stuff. I live in the USA now and I regularly fish offshore, inshore and freshwater (in tournaments and socially) and I use braided pretty much 99% of the time (the only exception for me is when i'm cranking for bass or flipping in semi-submerged bushes or 'buckbrush' which calls for fluoro to prevent the braid sticking in the wood and getting hung up- I even use it for drop shotting!). While it can take some time getting used to if switching over from mono and fluoros, it has many benefits which include it's durability/longevity, lack of stretch, super sensitivity and it floats which can be helpful with some techniques. But hey - you know all that!!

Here are a few tricks that I use and I hope they help you...

I like a braided line that is pretty supple, like Hi-Seas Grand Slam Braid (it's spools nicely and is easier for knot tying, the finished knots are nice and smooth). When I spool braid on my reel, I either use the braided line to make a few extra wraps around the spool and then tie it on or I use a small amount of mono to cover the base of the spool) before spooling, this will prevent any slipping. Then, I think the most critical thing is to spool up the line really tightly - the tighter the braid lays on the spool, the less problems you'll have - the looser the line, the more loops form and this increases backlashes and problems when casting. Sometimes if the braid gets loose on top of the spool (after fishing for a while - I usually have this happen when I'm fishing walkbaits because your putting slack in the line to create the action), an easy fix is just to run some line out while the boats moving slowly and reel it back on - with the line dragging in the water, it'll create some tension and allow you to crank it on pretty tightly (especially if you reel it in with the line between your thumb and index finger - even if you have a line guide). Also, make sure you don't over spool your reel (especially your spinning reels!). I typically tie a fluorocarbon leader onto my braid via an Albright knot (or a blood knot) - this is usually about 5-7' long. I also use a small dob of super glue on the knot just for my own peace of mind. Don't have your leader any longer than that because the knot can cause it to catch and lessen your casting distance. The fluoro leader is abrasion resistant, acts as a shock absorber and if the fish are finicky, it'll be less visible which may help your buddy get some bites.
If you want to use braided line direct to the lure, I usually use a jumbo black sharpie pen and darken the line about 7' up from the lure.

Other than that - stick with it! Once you get the hang of it - you'll love it too, I promise!
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Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎09-20-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

Right on Kim. Great story and great question! I've been using braid for about 10 years since Power Pro came on the market. There is definately a learning curve but the pluses far out way the downfalls.  Kim nailed it on the head with the basics of braid. A couple of other minor things to help along the way are:

 

1. Try not to spin the handle to close bail on your reel.  If you simply close with your hand instead you find that you reduce the opportunity for "looping" which can lead to tangle and knots.

 

2 When using twitch baits or topwater baits aways keep good line tension when retrieving. The more slack you have in the line the more you increase opportunity for knots. IE: reel the line tight before "jerking or twitching" and remember braid has no stretch so your twitches and jerks should be less pronounced. It takes far less movement to get the bait to work proplerly.

 

3. Lastly on hook sets, it's vital not to "Hammer" the fish, again due to the lack of stretch a simple lifting motion or small "twitch" will hammer home the hook.

 

Hope this helps!!

 

Tight Lines.

"If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the fish of lifetime is worth a thousand casts." D DeVos
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Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎09-25-2011

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

You can stop the braided line from slipping on your spool if you tie a peice of mono about 16 inch long to the braid and than start on the spool with the mono.It will allow you to load up the spool tight and avoid spool slippage.
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Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-12-2012

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

We don't fish with just one lure or bait. We don't use just one technique. Why would we use just one type of fishing line?
Technical tournament fishing or even just everyday angling presents challenges that call for both of the major line groups--monofilament and braided lines.
On our tournament redfish boat you will find 20 and 30 pound braid, 12 pound Ande mono filament, and even 6 pound monofilament for sight casing in clear shallow water.
Each has it's purpose and for each purpose, nothing will do better.
Learn to use each and you will increase your bag of tricks and put more fish in the boat.

Cheers
Drew
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Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-11-2012

mono vs braided line

AFTER FISHING COMMERCIALY AND AS A REC OVER 40 YEARS I ONLY USE MONO LINE FOR A LEADER. BRAIDED LINE [ANDRE BRAND] DOES NOT STRETCH LIKE MONO. YOU WILL HAVE BETER HOOK SETS. ALSO IF YOU HAVE A CROWS NEST PROBLEM, TRY LESS LINE ON THE SPOOL. ALSO WHEN CASTING INTO THE WIND, MAKE SURE U HAVE TENSION ON THE LINE BEFORE WINDING. ANOTHER ADVANTAGE IS THE DIAMETER. YOU CAN FISH MUCH HEAVIER LINE WITH THE SAME SPOOL SIZE.  ALWAYS PUT A FEW WRAPS OF MONO ON THE SPOOL THEN TIE THE BRAIDED TO IT. THIS WILL KEEP IT FROM SPINNING ON THE SPOOL.

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Mate
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-15-2013

Re: Redfish are popping! For some of us

I have been having really good luck with the 5" Gulp Jerk shad in camo color.